Pigeon Peas (Tuvar Lilva) in Coriander Masala

tuvar lilva subji

I spend a lot of time looking at every corner of Indian store here and I wonder about new vegetables that I have never tasted. Almost during every visit, I saw these frozen pigeon peas and wondered what to make with them. Then I saw my friend P making this delicious subji with them. She mentioned that her family loves these. They look almost like avrekalu(val) but do not have the slight bitter taste. They taste delicious. So I have been making this dish regularly.

Ingredients:
2 cups tuvar lilva (pigeoan peas)
1 tbl spn coconut
1 tea spn coriander seeds
1 tea spn cumin seeds
1 tea spn ginger-garlic paste
3-4 green chillies
1/2 cup onion
1/4 cup chopped coriander leaves with stems
1 tea spn mustard seeds
A pinch turmeric
1/4 cup chopped tomatoes
Oil
Salt

Method:
Cook tuvar lilva and keep it aside. Heat oil and fry coriander seeds, cumin seeds. Add ginger-garlic, green chillies, onions. When the onions become translucent, add coconut. Fry for a min. Grind with coriander leaves to a smooth paste. Heat a little oil, add mustard seeds. When they start popping, add curry leaves, onions, turmeric. Fry for few minutes. Then add tomato, cooked tuvar and the paste. Add salt, cover and cook till done.

PS: You can also use dried pigeon peas for this if you don’t find frozen ones. Soak them in water before cooking. If you do not find pigeon peas, use some other kind of peas, the taste will be different due to the kind of peas used.

Pictorial:

tuvar lilva subji1

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tuvar lilva subji5

tuvar lilva subji6

tuvar lilva subji

9 Comments for “Pigeon Peas (Tuvar Lilva) in Coriander Masala”

Shubha S

says:

Excellent! Isn’t pigeon peas called togari kayi in Kannada. Where did you get it? I am reminded of togari kayi bath, saaru and upma, the same way avarekalu is used. But I think avarekayi has more fans than togari kayi. What do you say?

says:

Sorry, never seen togari kayi and yes, I think it is togari kayi because that is what the name translates to :). I got it in Indian store here. Yes, I have heard about avarekayi a lot, not much togare kayi :).

meena

says:

hi,
dish looks lovely…and yes, it is togari kayi or togari kaalu which we get in Bangalore. This also tastes good in Akkitari uppittu…
Now I will surely try this dish..it looks so yummy!!!
-Meena.

Vinaya

says:

I made this today with white vatana
and it tasted good. The taste of corriander leaves ground in a gravy is something that I haven’t had before . Loved it .

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